Virus Studies

An equitable & responsible recovery from COVID-19

  • Mobilize for recovery through efficient and equitable distribution of vaccines

  • Invest in economic opportunities for women and mothers

  • Responsibly open public schools

  • Help small businesses stay open and pay their workers

Mobilize our recovery through efficient and equitable distribution of vaccines

While we’ve started to see an increased vaccination rate, and we need to make sure that all communities have access to vaccine appointments and that they are more equitably distributed across all 5 boroughs. We’ve seen how systemic racism can negatively affect the healthcare of communities of color and when it comes to COVID-19, we can’t make the same mistakes that have disproportionately impacted these same communities any longer.

 

Invest in economic opportunities for women and mothers

Access to childcare is vital for healthy, resilient, and sustainable communities, a fact highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic when our families were stretched to the limit.

 

When we prioritize affordable, accessible childcare, we strengthen - and enable - economic recovery. Two million women in the United States have left the labor force in the last year because when schools are shut, mothers carry the weight on their shoulders.  Families have lost income, and our children suffer.

 

We need to create a mechanism for realizing the economic value of unpaid labor at home.  We need to invest in retraining and transitional programs to make sure that women can return to the labor force to jobs that will take us into the future.

 

Responsibly open public schools

First, schools need to open safely, and remain open. We must also have clear communication between city officials, unions, teachers, administrators, and parents to avoid further confusion and stress. Teachers and parents alike have dealt with a vast and unprecedented lack of preparedness with remote learning and getting back to “normal” is going to require efficient systems and sound decision making.

 

Help small businesses stay open and pay their workers

Small businesses are the lifeblood of our communities and need to be protected from the ongoing economic crisis. As we start to enter the final phases of the pandemic, we should be assessing initiatives that have been implemented, like open streets and outdoor dining, in order to determine which we should keep, adjust, or cut. We have an opportunity to create a better atmosphere for small businesses for decades to come so that they can grow and thrive here, we just need elected officials willing to dig into the data and find out what works.